Sarah Palin has now clarified her insinuation that some parts of America are pro-America parts and some are … not.

We believe that the best of America is not all in Washington, D.C. We believe" — here the audience interrupted Palin with applause and cheers — "We believe that the best of America is in these small towns that we get to visit, and in these wonderful little pockets of what I call the real America, being here with all of you hard working very patriotic, um, very, um, pro-America areas of this great nation. This is where we find the kindness and the goodness and the courage of everyday Americans. Those who are running our factories and teaching our kids and growing our food and are fighting our wars for us. Those who are protecting us in uniform. Those who are protecting the virtues of freedom. [my emphasis]

I’m curious. Aside from asking Palin where she draws the line–how big does a "small town" get before it gets unpatriotic, I’d like to know. Are DC’s suburbs pro-America?

It seems worth a follow-up, after all, because all those civil servants living in Virginia’s DC suburbs–the ones running our military and our intelligence services and our bureaucracies–they might want to know whether or not the Republicans’ VP candidate believes they’re pro-American or not before they vote. John’s brother Joe McCain has already called them Communists, of course, but perhaps someone could clarify whether the McCain campaign believes that those voters in a must-win swing state are unpatriotic Communists.

A big percentage of Virginia’s voters at least work "in" Washington D.C. I guess Sarah Palin doesn’t want their anti-American vote?